Miller Mayer’s Steve Yale-Loehr Quoted re Immigration Controversies

Miller Mayer immigration attorney Steve Yale-Loehr was quoted recently by the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, and Fortune:

  • Los Angeles Times: http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-na-9thcircuit-travel-ban-20170530-story.html. Mr. Yale-Loehr said the Supreme Court might find it easier to reject President Trump’s travel ban based on a violation of existing law rather than constitutional grounds. “It is always hard to win an immigration case on constitutional grounds in the Supreme Court because immigration touches on foreign relations and national sovereignty issues,” he said. People outside the United States also generally don’t have U.S. constitutional rights, he noted, adding that the combination of the two rulings “provides a one-two punch against the executive order that will make it harder for the administration to win at the Supreme Court.”
  • Fortune: http://fortune.com/2017/06/12/trump-tweets-travel-ban/. “I think he shot himself in the legal foot,” Mr. Yale-Loehr said of President Trump’s comments about his preference for the original version of the ban.
  • New York Times: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/13/us/asylum-torture-venezuela.html. In “Torture Victim, Expecting a U.S. Handshake, Was Given Handcuffs Instead,” Mr. Yale-Loehr observed that “[i]t’s very unusual—almost unprecedented—that ICE would arrest an asylum applicant who is at a USCIS office waiting for their asylum interview.”

Miller Mayer immigration attorney Steve Yale-Loehr was recently quoted by USA Today in an article about the new supplemental information form for certain visa applicants. He noted that “U.S. government agencies already are reviewing people’s social media accounts. This new form isn’t going to add much to that existing effort.” However, he said he believes the new form will be used as a way to further delay and deny visas. “In essence, this new form is the ‘lite’ version of the administration’s travel ban, and much harder to fight,” he said. The article is at https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/news/2017/06/01/us-now-can-ask-travelers-facebook-twitter-handles/102393236/.

Miller Mayer immigration attorney Steve Yale-Loehr was quoted by The Guardian in an article about President Donald Trump’s “extreme vetting” efforts, including the new supplemental information form for certain visa applicants. ” This form simply puts into writing questions that consular officials could have and may have asked visa applicants before to determine whether they should be admitted to the United States,” he noted. At the very least, Mr. Yale-Loehr said he expects the new form will be used to delay and possibly deny visa applications while President Trump’s travel ban languishes in court. ” We’ll have to see over time whether, as applied, it seems that certain groups of people are being denied visas because of this form.” The article is at https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/jun/06/trump-travel-ban-extreme-vetting-supreme-court.

Miller Mayer immigration attorney Steve Yale-Loehr was quoted by Time.com in “How President Trump’s Tweets Hurt His Travel Ban.” He said, “I think [President Trump] shot himself in the legal foot.” The article is at http://time.com/4805973/travel-ban-supreme-court-donald-trump-tweets/.

Miller Mayer immigration attorney Steve Yale-Loehr was quoted by CNN in “Undocumented Grandmother Finds Sanctuary in North Carolina Church.” With reference to a statement by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement that it generally avoids arrests at “sensitive locations” such as houses of worship, Mr. Yale-Loehr noted that officials with a warrant can arrest undocumented immigrants regardless of whether they’re at a church, synagogue, or mosque. The article is at http://www.cnn.com/2017/05/31/us/undocumented-woman-ice-north-carolina-church/.

Miller Mayer immigration attorney Steve Yale-Loehr was quoted by Bloomberg BNA in “Skilled Foreign Worker Taking Your Job? It’s Legal.” Mr. Yale-Loehr noted that USCIS will continue increased site visits to review compliance with H-1B rules. The agency also can focus on “H-1B-dependent” employers, or those with a certain percentage of their workforce on the visas. Meanwhile, the Department of Labor can conduct investigations into whether H-1B workers are being paid properly, Mr. Yale-Loehr said. The article is available without a subscription at https://www.bna.com/skilled-foreign-worker-n73014451794/.

Miller Mayer immigration attorney Steve Yale-Loehr was quoted by the Cornell Chronicle in “Faculty Panelists Discuss Immigration Reform in America,” an article about an immigration policy panel he spoke on as part of the Cornell reunion. He discussed the drivers of migration, showing maps and figures and pointing out that worldwide migration spiked in 2015, led by massive movements from Syria, Afghanistan, and Somalia to other countries. “We have the largest crisis of refugees since World War II. Why are people fleeing? They’re fleeing war, they’re fleeing famine, they’re fleeing persecution, they’re fleeing climate change, they’re fleeing natural disasters,” he noted. Most refugees currently admitted to the United States are from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Burma, and Syria, he added. “We cannot send them back to a country where there’s a well-founded fear of persecution,” he said. The article is at http://news.cornell.edu/stories/2017/06/faculty-panelists-discuss-immigration-reform-america.

Miller Mayer immigration attorney Steve Yale-Loehr was quoted by the Times of India in “Indian IT Companies Sharply Cut H-1B Dependence.” Mr. Yale-Loehr said he agreed with the conclusion that technological change is prompting many India-based companies to file fewer H-1B petitions, rather than the words or actions of the U.S. President or Congress. “The rise of artificial intelligence and cloud computing mean fewer people are needed to perform certain IT jobs.” He also said that President Trump’s executive order calling for limits on H-1B visas “looks backward, not forward. The current unemployment rate for computer-related jobs is 2.5%—lower than the overall national unemployment rate of 4.4%. We should encourage bright foreign students to stay and work in the United States after they graduate, not send them overseas to compete against us.” The article is at http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/business/indian-it-companies-sharply-cut-h-1b-dependence/articleshow/59026749.cms.

2017-08-04T14:15:08+00:00 June 19th, 2017|